Author Topic: Coronavirus  (Read 33485 times)

lighter

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Re: Coronavirus
« Reply #405 on: November 01, 2020, 11:58:08 AM »
I'm sorry tot was cancelled there, but glad you were safe and finding ways to enjoy it with your ds, Tupp.

My youngest threw herself into the holiday spirit, helped shop, stuff and arrange treat bags....really good onesbc we expected under 30 kids, then dressed up SO cool and warmed to her part...providing a memorable Halloween for the kids in the year of Covid.

She put up a table to provide distance.  She kept me focused and we laughed and laughed the whole time.

She scared 3 teen boys so badly in me 1 got a treat bag, then I chased them off our street while they laughed screamed and fl talking about how they had a real haunted house experience....just giddy and so pleased to be away from us.

Next year I want to do zombies with our cars parked askew....some door flung open with bodies and real zombies that jump and chase.....SO much fun.

We truck or treated the other big haunted house and that guy was dressed up and chucking candy down a decorated tube, one at a time.  Much fun and banter and happiness was had by all.

If I didn't say, our theme was scary clowns this year, if imperfectly crafted.  I threw on my traditional witch costume....youngest did Victorian clothing with amazing uncanny makeup....so cool to look at.  With heels she was 6feet tall!  Beads, silk and round sunglasses beneath a very interesting hat.

Will have to look up Elk bars....the kids say those are most prized treat.  I think are homemade....maybe next year.

Lighter






Twoapenny

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Re: Coronavirus
« Reply #406 on: November 01, 2020, 12:31:17 PM »
That sounds so lovely, Lighter, I'm really hoping we can do something very big next year.  It was eerily quiet last night; usually it's really busy from about 4pm onwards, the little ones first and then the older ones come and it's so much fun.  I'm glad you had such a good time and enjoyed yourselves.

I've decided I'm going to have to be more proactive about scheduling in fun stuff for us and social time in some way as well, plus different activities for son.  It's so chaotic here I just can't see how they're going to get a handle on it.  I think we're going to be in for months again now.  I'm digging deep to come up with ideas of things to do and ways to get out and about when the weather allows.  It did stop raining as it was getting dark tonight so we got out for half an hour which made a difference xx

lighter

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Re: Coronavirus
« Reply #407 on: November 01, 2020, 03:51:31 PM »
Tup:
The thing about going through my life in pictures...my father and mother and grandparent's and great granparent's and great great was...
it somehow finished processing all the stuff knocking around my brain.


I feel super present. 

Very focused on making the most of my limited moments on this earth.  No regrets or panic.  Just...
the comfort of being present and having very clear priorities without the past or other people's stuff pulling me off track.

And it feels like....experiencing every moment as though it was my last.....without being sad or wrong.

Just....SO laser focused on the moments, and it's almost an altered state....feels like, anyway.  Just noticing everything around me in the bathroom brings comfort and joy and gratitude for what I have in those moments.....for the safety and power and privacy and chance to create more sacred space for myself and lived ones.

I don't care about collecting stuff...I care about honoring things that bring me joy.  I care about having an uncluttered space to live my life.

So.....I have the challenge to edit down generations of stuff...with my dibs helping...so we all have sunny floors and spaces.

We got so much done at my dad's lake house.  So much to do, still.

It feels likebreathing pure air....no junk or distractions, even though we rarely agree on everything.  We have the same goals.

Lighter


lighter

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Re: Coronavirus
« Reply #408 on: November 03, 2020, 12:45:50 PM »
Tupp:

Liverpool is putting a Corona virus test program of 100% of people as a pilot program for entire country.

Is that a positI've thing, or do you think they won't follow through?

I saw a 1 hour turnaround for the results projected.

((Tupp and son))

Lighter

Twoapenny

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Re: Coronavirus
« Reply #409 on: November 03, 2020, 01:46:08 PM »
Tupp:

Liverpool is putting a Corona virus test program of 100% of people as a pilot program for entire country.

Is that a positI've thing, or do you think they won't follow through?

I saw a 1 hour turnaround for the results projected.

((Tupp and son))

I honestly don't know, Lighter, I don't see how it would work in any practical long term way? It's voluntary so I'd imagine a lot of asymptomatic people wouldn't bother (or certainly not more than once).  People would have to take time off work to do it; many  can't afford to.  Organisational skills in the UK are generally always shambolic, long queues, things not happening when they're supposed to, IT systems are always terrible and crash constantly.  They've not managed to keep up with demand for tests for people who have symptoms so I'm slightly baffled as to how they're suddenly going to be able to test half a million people every two weeks (or weekly according to some reports) and churn out the results in an hour.  You'd only know you're negative at that time; the moment you come into contact with someone else you're at risk again so people would still need to keep away from each other, presumably?  You'd still need people to self isolate if they're told they have it and there are people who won't (already cases where that's happened).  I'm skeptical, to be honest, especially if they then want to roll it out nationwide - I'm just not convinced that a government who've made such a monumental cock up of it from the word go are suddenly going to start running and efficient and effective service, or that people will comply with it.  But we'll see, it would be nice to be wrong about it and for it to make a huge difference! xx

Lighter

lighter

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Re: Coronavirus
« Reply #410 on: November 03, 2020, 09:03:43 PM »
You'd think all failing global areas would bring in consultants from areas of the world who put competent testing programs in place, wouldn't you?

I mean.....someone already figured it out.  Is it willful ignorance?  Stupidity?  Pride?

Lighter

Twoapenny

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Re: Coronavirus
« Reply #411 on: November 04, 2020, 01:11:37 AM »
I don't know, Lighter - and I also don't know how I put my last reply inside a quote box :)  Lol.  I suspect it's money - currently all the major systems to deal with this have been contracted out to private companies run by family members of Tory MPs.  12 billion has been spent on a Test and Trace system that doesn't work, and the woman running it is married to the MP who is supposed to investigate fairness and clarity or something like that.  It's another blatant rob from the public purse and my guess is that's the underlying reason for not taking - free of charge, I think - offers of efficient testing programmes in other countries.  I think as well that the cossetted, over protected public schoolboys running the country are so arrogant that they'd rather let tens of thousands die than accept help when it's offered, particularly when the whole 'we're leaving Europe, we won the bloody war' nonsense has been raging for so long now.  I suspect it would be seen as showing weakness.  Top docs have been saying from the beginning that test and trace should be dealt with in local areas with each local authority choosing the level of measures to take dependent on current numbers and the number of vulnerable people.  Maybe if this scheme goes well that's what will happen now but to be honest I think it could all be too late anyway - it seems to be out of control again with hospitals saying they're over run and ambulance services saying they're very busy.  If it's true?  No-one seems to know anything anymore.  Sigh.  I'm off out for my walk!  Have lovely day xx xx
« Last Edit: November 04, 2020, 12:09:13 PM by Twoapenny »

Hopalong

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Re: Coronavirus
« Reply #412 on: November 04, 2020, 12:04:21 PM »
Quote
the cossetted, over protected public schoolboys running the country are so arrogant that they'd rather let tens of thousands die

Hate to be so one-note as I am when I pull way back and stare hard at society.

But the truth is to me, toxic masculinity has been destroying the world for a long time. At every level. War, pollution, corruption, etc etc. Doesn't mean women can't be toxic too, but when cultures allow the toxic side of male power to dominate and fester, that kind of entitlement/arrogance rules.

Because empathy understands the power of cooperation and nurture, it is more intelligent than raw power. Raw dominance power, unfortunately, may be strategic about some systems but is stupid about humanity, imagination and community.

We're in for some hard years. Meanwhile, back to trying not to obsess over election updates more than once an hour.

Covid is like Honey Badger, and many politicians.

hugs
Hops
"That'll do, pig, that'll do."

Twoapenny

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Re: Coronavirus
« Reply #413 on: November 04, 2020, 12:17:21 PM »
Quote
the cossetted, over protected public schoolboys running the country are so arrogant that they'd rather let tens of thousands die

Hate to be so one-note as I am when I pull way back and stare hard at society.

But the truth is to me, toxic masculinity has been destroying the world for a long time. At every level. War, pollution, corruption, etc etc. Doesn't mean women can't be toxic too, but when cultures allow the toxic side of male power to dominate and fester, that kind of entitlement/arrogance rules.

Because empathy understands the power of cooperation and nurture, it is more intelligent than raw power. Raw dominance power, unfortunately, may be strategic about some systems but is stupid about humanity, imagination and community.

We're in for some hard years. Meanwhile, back to trying not to obsess over election updates more than once an hour.

Covid is like Honey Badger, and many politicians.

hugs
Hops

I agree, Hopsie, and not in an 'anti man' way - I think that kind of masculine behaviour is just as damaging for those men who aren't like that (and yep, some women can be awful as well).  But overall we'd have far fewer battles on so many fronts if people worked co-operatively.  Saying that, I've no idea how it would ever be implemented on a national or global level.  People here are panic buying again, stripping the shelves bare and it's so clearly unnecessary and incredibly stupid, but still they're doing it.  The queue outside one shop in Essex was, apparently, 1300 feet long yesterday.  We went in to town this morning for our acupuncture appointment and to go to the library.  We can walk around the edge of town for both of those things so it's quiet, but you walk along the edge of one of the main car parks and it was rammed, with queues of cars waiting to get in and people with trolleys and arm fulls of bags.  Every shop was rammed.  All the big shops offer online delivery as standard and most of the small ones set up an order and delivery service that they've carried on running since March for people who can't get out, so there's no need for anyone to be shopping.  But so many people are.  It's crazy.  The NHS has been set to its highest alert level which only happens when they expect to be overwhelmed.  And people are worrying about shopping.  It's just crazy.

Yes.  Hard years to come. xx

Twoapenny

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Re: Coronavirus
« Reply #414 on: November 23, 2020, 11:50:17 AM »
Well the local numbers are finally starting to drop after many weeks of rising, which is good and I hope it stays that way.  We've only got another week of this lockdown, though, so quite what will happen after this I don't know - other than we'll still be staying in.  I will be very, very glad when this gets down to numbers no worse than (insert all the various illnesses that happen all the time anyway) and it just feels something like normal again.

Hopalong

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Re: Coronavirus
« Reply #415 on: November 23, 2020, 01:29:29 PM »
Amen to all that, (((((Tupp))))).

At least there's encouraging news on the vaccine front. Nothing clear yet on distribution but if we can all just endure the test of these locked-in times (and mostly I think we can)....then one day we'll look back on this period as a benchmark, a threshold, and a Before and After time.

I have hope humanity will learn something from it all, and be changed in good as well as the desperate ways. But no predictions. All that will be visible and clear to future historians, I think, not to us in our lifetimes.

If there's anything that uplifts the notion of being present, Covid-19 would be it. I just revisited an old lay sermon I did on agnosticism, and was surprised to find the truth of it for me still holds. Openness. Not knowing. Trusting, despite. Focusing on the verb, which in my mind is an active practice "to DO faith[or trust]" and not to passively "HAVE ['faith' or whatever]. A lot got cleared up for me when I figured that out. Two extracts sum it up:

I have a new goal: to “do” faith [trust] rather than to “have” faith. Consider that “to place faith in” is an active choice rather than to passively “have”. It means to trust. I have come to believe at least this, which may be sounder than I know: I believe that I will do, or experience, faith, the more I choose to do, or experience, trust. The challenge for me, and perhaps for some of you too, is to trust with bravery and discernment, rather than surrender to mayhem.

As I wrote the conclusion, I remember thinking about how much time I'd spent hung up on the noun--what I should/could/could not have faith IN. The object of the sentence was really all that people argued about. Like: I believe/can't believe IN X, or y or z.

It hit me that the object of the sentence [diagramming sentences for two years] was not the point at all. (I had used an elaborate analogy about sleep to structure the talk. Agnosticism being similar to the membranous state between being awake and being allllmost asleep. Near hypnotic, come to think of it.)

....many years of being agnostic have taught me that you can’t get joy by willing it. You can’t “get” sleep at all, really. You have to allow it to get you. Maybe it’s the same as faith. As elusive and as comforting. Maybe trying to get it, as though it is an object you can grasp, is exactly what keeps it away. And maybe like the spirit of sleep, the spirit of faith has nothing to do with the objects of sentences, but only with their verbs.

hugs
Hops
« Last Edit: November 23, 2020, 03:07:44 PM by Hopalong »
"That'll do, pig, that'll do."

Twoapenny

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Re: Coronavirus
« Reply #416 on: November 24, 2020, 05:26:39 AM »
Hopsie, 'do' faith (trust) instead of having it has really rung a bell with me and I am going to ponder on that and let it sink in some more.  I can't say I'm feeling hopeful that humanity will learn from it but I certainly have, and I really want to keep what I've learnt in my life and allow it to shape my life from now on, rather than society's demands and my own unrealistic expectations.  And perhaps as I do that I will encounter more people who have learnt from it and my faith will increase.  But yes, it may well be not in our own life times.  I hope there is a way to peek in and see what's happening.

I am crossing my fingers re vaccines.  Not sure if son will be able to have one as they're not tested on anyone who isn't already fit and healthy so I will need to look into that more with regard to all his other problems (a friend with MS has already been advised by his doc that at this early stage him taking a vaccine wouldn't be wise).  But I will certainly be there with my sleeve rolled up and was joking to a friend yesterday that this chemical concoction might be the thing that sorts me out :)  If at least I know my chances of picking it up and bringing it home to him are lower that will give me some peace of mind.

New tiers will be in place when we come out of lockdown next week, with level three being the most restrictions and level one being the least.  Our area is likely to be level 1, which is good, I'm just hoping they're putting things in place to stop people from other areas visiting (and what will they do about unis?  Students from a high risk area home for Christmas, then going back to a low risk area, possibly infected?  Don't know).  But anyway, it's looking about as positive as it can just now so that's good.

Completely unrelated, but when I was feeding the birds this morning I looked up at the sky.  It was still dark but the street lamps were on, very cloudy sky and there were a flock of seagulls flying overhead and the light from the street lamps caught the undersides of them so they looked as if they were glowing.  They flew across a really dark, heavy cloud and I could just see these sort of glowing silhouettes gliding across the sky and it looked so beautiful.  I don't know why it popped into my head, possibly because I think the thing I've really learnt because of Covid is that I like things like that more than coffee shops and department stores.  When son was at college I wouldn't have been looking up, I'd have been racing through that job to get on with the next one because I'd have an endless list in my mind of what needed doing before we left that morning.  I'd have missed it.  That's what I don't want to get back to once all of this is over.  I want my normal to be different.

Hopalong

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Re: Coronavirus
« Reply #417 on: November 24, 2020, 11:34:11 AM »
Quote
I like things like that more than coffee shops and department stores

Oh me too, Tupp, me too! That's the mystical or poetic or even metaphysical streak right there. Should be on a blog, imo!

One of the neat things about you is how wide-ranging your mind is. Very granular and pragmatic about some things, and deeply soulful (I dunno what/if a soul is but you get the idea) about others. I like the way these qualities weave in and out of your writing.

You're a very keen observer, and that quality of attention is rare.

Hugs
Hops
"That'll do, pig, that'll do."

Hopalong

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Re: Coronavirus
« Reply #418 on: November 24, 2020, 06:24:05 PM »
Opinion by Lucy Jones [Washington Post]
November 24, 2020 at 12:33 p.m. EST

Lucy Jones, a seismologist at the California Institute of Technology, is the author of “The Big Ones: How Natural Disasters Have Shaped Us (and What We Can Do About Them)” and host of the podcast “Getting Through It.”

When the upcoming holidays inspire us to take more risks and let down our guard, we are not being resentful, stupid or selfish. We are being human. But covid-19 does not care that we perceive it to be less risky — it is more dangerous than ever.

As a seismologist who has spent much of my career helping policymakers understand seismic risk, I have seen many well-meaning and intelligent people struggle to comprehend the risk they face and weigh appropriate action. Knowing the science behind how people think about risk can help us understand why the right choices are so difficult — and why we should make them anyway.

Human beings understand reality and real-world risk using two parallel systems: an experiential, intuitive approach and an analytical, deliberative approach. The experiential system is an effective tool that has enabled human beings to survive our evolution. Long before risk analysis was a science, we relied on our gut to decide whether an animal was safe to approach or food was safe to eat.

As life became more complex, we developed an analytical system — a way to calculate and weigh risk factors rationally: assessing densities, probabilities and exposure the way engineers, scientists and economists do. But doing so takes time, work and conscious thought, so the experiential risk assessment is still a major component of our psyches and our first response to any danger.

The analytical system would tell us that the risk of catching the coronavirus is directly proportional to the number of contagious people in our community — and today, the daily case rate in the United States is skyrocketing. In many communities it is now more than 10 times what it was in April, meaning that any activity that we do now is also 10 times more dangerous than it was in April. But it doesn’t feel that way, and the psychology of how people perceive risk gives us two reasons for that.

First, we are always more afraid of things we do not understand. Early man could not protect himself from a danger he didn’t see or comprehend, so a perception of uncertainty increases our perception of risk.

In April, we did not know definitively how covid-19 was transmitted, how likely we were to die if we got it or whether it was going to be treatable. Because we know more now, the disease seems less frightening. Even though we now know that masks are the best protection, we may be less likely to wear one because we don’t feel as much at risk.

Second, our experiential system is tied to our emotions — whether something feels good or bad. We “rely on our gut” or think that something just doesn’t feel right. But these emotions mean that something we see as good, we also see as safe. Controlled studies have shown that even experts who have studied a particular risk will evaluate an exposure as safer if it has been tied to a significant emotional benefit.

Right now, after months of being in isolation, we are highly aware of the benefit of social interaction. Being with family for Thanksgiving has such a large upside that we are unable to appreciate the risk that doing so really poses. Seeing your parents now is much more likely to kill them than it would have been in April. But because it holds such benefit to both them and us, our gut just can’t agree.

Similarly, the benefits of not wearing masks — being able to see someone else’s face, the emotional benefit of that nonverbal connection with others — makes not wearing a mask seem less dangerous than it is. Notice how many public figures wear a mask but take it off to speak. The act of speaking makes your breath much more dangerous, but we discount the extra risk because of the benefits of a better social connection.

The third wave of the covid-19 pandemic is upon us just as the holidays beckon. We’re hearing a lot about pandemic fatigue, shutdown rebellions and pervasive resentment. In the same way we think that the obesity epidemic can be fixed by people just eating less, we’re blaming people for not having the character or willpower to just wear masks and self-isolate.

Instead of blaming the victims, we should try to understand why people behave the way they do. Well-meaning and intelligent people struggle to understand the hazards they face and weigh appropriate action.

But even as we recognize the difficulty, we need to use our rational minds to tell our gut to behave. Stay away from your family during the holidays so everyone will still be alive in the spring.
"That'll do, pig, that'll do."

Bettyanne

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Re: Coronavirus
« Reply #419 on: November 28, 2020, 02:03:47 PM »
Im in San francisco with my daughter Meghan......she drove me down along with her fiancé Jared after Bill died.....but now the covid is back doing its thing which I guess never stopped.  I am afraid to fly or take train back up to Seattle......and then ferry to Bainbridge Island, WA
I hope your all doing as well as can possible be at this time???
I don't know what to say.....never in my life of 77 years do I remember anything this bad......
Stay well and safe friends......keep a good distance away and wear masks.
Love,
Bettyanne