Author Topic: Coronavirus  (Read 10948 times)

Twoapenny

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Re: Coronavirus
« Reply #435 on: December 05, 2020, 09:01:44 AM »
I'm tired. I've not got much more to say then that. One description a person used to describe Covid was Russian Roulette. It does feel that way.

It does feel that way, P, although some people's chances are better than others.  We're just avoiding it full stop.  I don't like getting a cold, let alone anything else, I certainly don't want to be catching this as well xx

Twoapenny

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Re: Coronavirus
« Reply #436 on: December 08, 2020, 01:02:22 PM »
Well it's not looking too good here despite the fact we've just had another four week lockdown.  Overall numbers have dropped a bit but deaths are still going up and locally the death rate doubled over the last week.  It does worry me, even though we're taking as many precautions as we can.  They administered the first vaccines today; I think son is in one of the priority groups that they've put forward so far (I say think as the information is changing so fast that I can't keep up but the last thing I read said he'd be in one of the priority groups).  Although most people I've spoken to this week are saying they won't take a vaccine for it so I have been feeling anxious that even vaccinated we'll still have to be very careful as it won't be 100% effective so there would still be a chance of catching it off someone else.  I'd kind of hoped that by this time we'd be looking back on this as that awful event that happened in 2020 but it still feels as though we're very much in the middle of it all.  Crossing fingers that by this time next year we'll be looking back on it.

Hopalong

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Re: Coronavirus
« Reply #437 on: December 08, 2020, 03:56:43 PM »
Yup, numbers are bad. And rising.
I expect we'll reach half a million deaths in the US because of...politics. Really ugly, very sad politics. For which the only answer is outstanding education everywhere.

But in the now, nothing for it but to keep on weaving, avoiding the dangers. Glad your son may soon be vaccinated. You too as his caregiver, I hope? What I just heard on a public radio (non-political) forum was that distribution is going to be long, complex, etc. Could be late summer or worse before adequte numbers of vaccinated people are reached. The toxic delusional administration focused on production, not distribution. And since the US also refused to purchase adequate quantities of additional doses, other countries got to Pfizer in time to order them.

The short-sighted....aaaaagh, why vent. I am nearly all vented out!

Got a cold the other day, a NORMAL cold. Feeling better already but there was that hour or two (before I researched again--sneezing and runny noses are rare for Covid-19) when I was asking myself...was it a surface touch? A delivery? I forgot to spray the gate latch? Was it socializing around the bonfire? That creepy crowd of screeching women (screeching spews more microdroplets) at that restaurant? Etc.

I'm with you, Tupp, on just avoiding the hell out of it. Taking as few risks as possible, just hunkering down to endure it. Ain't easy. (I wore two masks today on a necessary excursion, and gloves--never bother with those--because mechanics had to sit in and work on my car), took a spray and paper towels to wipe it all down before driving it away. Noticing, noticing, how often people think six feet (an arbitrary number my doc reminded me "isn't magic") means something sorta like awww, let's say three....ai yi yi.

But this too....will pass.

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Hops
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Twoapenny

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Re: Coronavirus
« Reply #438 on: December 09, 2020, 05:15:46 AM »
It will pass, Hopsie, I'm just hoping I come out the other side a better person.  At the minute I'm feeling increasingly bitter and resentful.  I hope that goes away at some point.  It's funny but the people I've spoken to or know who are having to be careful because they are at risk (or someone they know is) seem to be coping with it more calmly and rationally than people who aren't at particular risk themselves.  Just my limited observations of my own circle.  I was chatting to an elderly lady at the bus stop and her responses were very similar to other elderly people I've spoken to.  I asked her how she's been with all of it and she said well you just have to get on with it.  We've missed seeing family, grandchildren, family events like Christmas get togethers have had to be put on hold but she said "I rather miss them this year and see them for years to come then get together now and not be here next Christmas".  It's perspective but I must admit I am struggling with mine at the minute.  I've purposely not asked people how they feel about the vaccine because I know I'm over-reacting to anyone who tells me they won't take it but people seem to want to tell me and it's out of their mouths before I can say "don't say anything, I don't want to know!"  It's finding the balance.  We'll both be taking ours as soon as it's available and I can't tell you how grateful I am to be living somewhere where it's even an option.  Can you imagine living in slums or shanty towns as so many people are, where this is just ripping through and they've no access to healthcare or long term support.  And might not be able to get a vaccine in any case, because of cost?  I can't imagine how it would feel to be living like that and then be aware that people are turning it down.  It's not my business, I know, and I know I've turned down things in the past that other people would have wanted but I think I'm just finding the overall situation a bit much.  We really are a global community now and I don't feel that we behave like that a lot of the time.

But yes - son is in one of the priority groups (group 6, I've now been informed).  They've rejigged the numbers regarding deaths amongst adults with learning disability and for someone of my son's age his chance of dying from it is thirty times higher than another lad of the same age without a learning disability.  That was a pretty sobering statistic as well.  I don't know about care givers; groups are calling for it but they haven't announced that yet.  They are dosing care workers in care homes but I'm waiting to hear about those in the community.  It may be that the GP has some leeway and can sort something out but it's a waiting game at the moment.  Waiting, waiting, waiting.  We'll get there in the end.

I hope your cold clears up!  Any sniffle makes you think now.  Interestingly I haven't had a cold and I normally get one in the run up to Christmas.  Best not count my chickens though, there's still a couple of weeks to go! xx

Twoapenny

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Re: Coronavirus
« Reply #439 on: December 12, 2020, 10:05:48 AM »
Just grumbling.  Cases are up, hospital admissions are up, deaths have dropped slightly but are still high.  People seem to have become immune to 1500 - 3000 a week dying from it.  I know your numbers over there are a lot higher but even so, the lack of concern from many here bothers me.  Scientists are warning that we'll experience a third wave after people get together over Christmas.  GP surgeries have pulled out of the vaccination programme as they haven't got enough staff to do their normal work and vaccinate people for twelve hours a day.  My best friend's husband (who is at risk) has had to self isolate (their son is high risk) after a work colleague continued to come in to work FOR TWO DAYS AFTER HIS WIFE TOOK A POSITIVE TEST AND THEN FOR ANOTHER DAY WHEN HE DEVELOPED SYMPTOMS HIMSELF.  I mean seriously, how are people still not getting it?  The work colleagues wife is a carer so may have taken it into other people's homes as well.  The whole office is now off work until just before Christmas because they can't be sure he wasn't in contact with all of them at some point.  We've been in to town to our lovely local cinema (lots of precautions and it was us and three other people in there, many feet between us) and on walking back to the bus stop walked past a barber's shop containing two barbers and four blokes waiting for a hair cut, none of whom were wearing masks, with all the doors and windows shut.  Crazy.

But in other news, my favourite second hand furniture shop has opened again so I may well do an early morning dash in there with my measurements to hand to see if I can get any of the stuff I want from them instead of having to buy cheap flat pack.  That's good.  Meanwhile, staying home, staying away from people and trying to stay positive even though it's difficult when so many just seem to be taking no notice.  I think I notice it more because we're in a town, so there's just more people about in a smaller area.  The sun is shining, though :) xx

lighter

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Re: Coronavirus
« Reply #440 on: December 12, 2020, 01:32:00 PM »
Did you find anything good at the 2bd hand shop, Tupp?

Sorry people aren't being careful.  Some have to work.  Some dont believe in the science.  You keep taking precautions and seeking your joy, ((Tupp.))

Lightet




Twoapenny

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Re: Coronavirus
« Reply #441 on: December 12, 2020, 01:50:17 PM »
Did you find anything good at the 2bd hand shop, Tupp?

Sorry people aren't being careful.  Some have to work.  Some dont believe in the science.  You keep taking precautions and seeking your joy, ((Tupp.))

Lightet

I didn't go in, Lighter, just peeked through the window.  They shut because of Covid, then had a flood so they've really been up against it and much of their furniture had to be chucked because the flood water ruined it.  So there's more space in there than usual (that will change, I imagine).  I'll go one morning in the week, first thing when it's still quiet and no-one else is around.  I saw a beautiful chest of drawers, far too big for my place but chest high, curved and crying out for some wax and a good buff.  I could do with two wardrobes with drawers underneath, a new desk for son's room, a small bookcase that can double as a bedside table in my room and a nicer TV unit/storage thing for the sitting room, as well as a new sofa.  Almost everything, really lol.  But they sell nice pieces in there for good prices so I can get better stuff for less than I'd pay for new cheap stuff, if you know what I mean.  They also have lots of nice extras like cushion covers and lampshades; they even had some weird kid's toy thing that son had wanted for ages and that we couldn't find anywhere as they stopped making them a long time ago.  There was one in the window one time when we walked past; he was delighted.

Yep - we are just avoiding people in general.  I think I struggle when I see the places where everyone has worked so hard to make it safe and keep it safe - and then two doors along no precautions at all.  But we'll keep doing our thing and it will all be good in the end xx

Hopalong

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Re: Coronavirus
« Reply #442 on: December 12, 2020, 02:13:14 PM »
I think you're so wise to be considering used furniture, Tupp.
I was in that industry.

Old furniture offers 90% of the time much better materials and construction than new. I have an early-60s sofa that's solid as a tank. Simple slipcovers or reupholstery if affordable is all these need in most cases.

Where I used to work I did a great deal of research on materials. Most new furniture is toxic and adds to the endocrine-disrupting chemical load in the body, which has been implicated by researchers and epidemiologist in developmental brain disorders, cancer, infertility and even obesity. They call them "obesogens."

There's an absolute forest of poorly-regulated toxic chemicals in new household furnishings, flooring, carpets, foam stuffing in cushions and pillows, bedding, laminates, anything with particleboard or synthetic lumber, vinyl, drapes, etc. Flame retardants, nanoparticle fabric treatments, pesticides, toxic stains and dyes and on and on. The off-gassing VOCs (volatile organic compounds) from plastics and vinyls doesn't even end when the "new" smell is gone, but continues for years undetecably.

I MUCH prefer well-built old furniture! It's not only less expensive but avoids another discarded thing going off to a dump or landfill -- keeps it out of the waste stream.

Haven't resuscitated that rant for a while now! Hope you enjoy your shopping and find pieces you can work with and enjoy for years to come.

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Hops
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Twoapenny

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Re: Coronavirus
« Reply #443 on: December 13, 2020, 01:11:35 AM »
Zoiks!  I didn't know all that, Hospie - I've always gone for second hand just because I can get nicer pieces for less money and it tends to be better made, means another tree hasn't been cut down and so on.  I like the history with old pieces as well, not that I usually know what it is but I can make something up in my head :)  But all that chemical, health impacting stuff - yuk!  I had no idea.  Is it all just to do with the processes they put them through and chemicals they treat them with?  I'll probably have to get son's bed new as it's a particular kind of storage that I'm after and the chances of one of those being in the shop second hand are slim (I'll have a look, though!).  But everything else I'll try to get through them.  They also take furniture; son's current bed still has life in it, it's just too small for him now so they can have that and our sofa is very old and battered but might do someone a turn (we got it free from someone who was moving and that was about seven years ago now so it's on it's not as good as it once was but it can still do the job).  I might be able to sort it so that they take the old stuff when they pick up the new which would be handy.  Nice to have a little project to think about.  I love the sound of your 60s sofa!  It's great when you get a good piece that just lasts forever xx

Hopalong

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Re: Coronavirus
« Reply #444 on: December 13, 2020, 08:41:32 AM »
Quote
Is it all just to do with the processes they put them through and chemicals they treat them with?

Exactly that. Indoor air pollution is often worse, due to buildup and inadequate ventilation, than outdoor air pollution. Candles, cleaning products, furniture, carpets, cleaning products, personal care products and cosmetics, on and on.....
https://www.blf.org.uk/support-for-you/indoor-air-pollution/causes

https://www.ewg.org/research/dirty-dozen-list-endocrine-disruptors?gclid=CjwKCAiAlNf-BRB_EiwA2osbxeh-mLEpGPB_ds-T5Ne8R65qorKuafxHQ8q89w3iL_m6Rh55NNFcHBoCjsgQAvD_BwE

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2677823/
Note that while PBDE's have been banned as flame retardants, it took industry no time to come up with a slightly tweaked new formula (Firemaster) that researchers expect is just as toxic.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2677823/

Bottom line is that the chemical industry wordwide is valued at over $80 billion annually (imagine the lobbying budgets). As recently as ten years ago (unlikely to have improved since), it was reported that the US tests only about 10% of new chemicals for human and environmental safety, and the industry makes new forumulas all the time. Basically, we're human sponges and if a kind of pesticide or plastic or finish makes a product shinier or cheaper or look more appealing to the consumer eye, manufacturers aren't staying up at night worrying about the long-term chemical load in our bodies.

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Hops
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sKePTiKal

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Re: Coronavirus
« Reply #445 on: December 13, 2020, 09:20:11 AM »
Our "bubble" here has tightened. (Not that I ever had or am starting a massive social life.) Hol's very freaked out about the possibility of getting the virus; not knowing and then giving it to someone else - any of her friends or me. So, she's not inviting anyone out to visit -- and when she does, has her list of things to ask them, prior. It's usually one or two people at a time now.

I think one of my issues last week was how much running around I had to do between Kitty & car inspections. With all the covid protocols and especially masks - I'm reading/picking up more negativity from people than ever. It's DEPRESSING to me, especially in this season... that people even when interacting are all so closed off and unfriendly.
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Twoapenny

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Re: Coronavirus
« Reply #446 on: December 13, 2020, 01:11:42 PM »
Our "bubble" here has tightened. (Not that I ever had or am starting a massive social life.) Hol's very freaked out about the possibility of getting the virus; not knowing and then giving it to someone else - any of her friends or me. So, she's not inviting anyone out to visit -- and when she does, has her list of things to ask them, prior. It's usually one or two people at a time now.

I think one of my issues last week was how much running around I had to do between Kitty & car inspections. With all the covid protocols and especially masks - I'm reading/picking up more negativity from people than ever. It's DEPRESSING to me, especially in this season... that people even when interacting are all so closed off and unfriendly.

That's a shame, Skep (about people being more unfriendly).  I guess it's been going on for so long now and it's so grim that people are fatigued with it all.  In our local area I have to say I've seen the opposite - people are going out of their way to say hi and chat a bit.  I think because the masks cover facial expressions (I still find myself smiling at people even though they can't see it and then I realise I need to put it into words as well lol).  But I know here everyone is fed up with it and I imagine it's similar over there.  It's caused huge problems in pretty much everyone's situation and it's just gone on for so blooming long - with no real end in sight yet.  Bleurgh.  I'll be glad when it's over.

Hopsie, thank you for all of those links, I'll have a read later.  I suspect they're going to make me glad I don't usually buy new furniture!  Lol.  I really wish that every government in every country would bring in legislation so that anything that's produced has to be sustainable, no risk to health (known risk, anyway) and that everyone involved has to be paid properly.  I know it would make things more expensive but how much of what we all buy is really necessary?  And what could we get second hand instead, or just make do with something else?  We do a pretty good job of rarely buying new.  Even tech I usually pick up second hand as there are loads of places that refurbish phones, laptops etc and we've always done alright with it.  It's difficult picking your way through all the information; I try to buy as ethically as I can but you have to put in a lot of time and leg work checking things out and a lot of people just don't have the time (or don't realise it's even an issue).  Wishful thinking, I know.

In slightly better news, although numbers in the county overall still haven't dropped much, in our local area there's been a pretty big drop and we've very few cases now.  That makes me feel better as we only tend to go from here to the library or cinema.  The town we are going to visit tomorrow (to look at the houses) is also pretty low now so I feel a bit easier about it.  Funnily enough I told son we were going to look at places in case they're nice enough to move into and he didn't protest - he normally grumbles if I mention moving but the idea didn't seem to phase him.  Or maybe he wasn't listening properly lol xx

Hopalong

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Re: Coronavirus
« Reply #447 on: December 13, 2020, 01:58:53 PM »
Quote
I really wish that every government in every country would bring in legislation so that anything that's produced has to be sustainable, no risk to health (known risk, anyway) and that everyone involved has to be paid properly.  I know it would make things more expensive but how much of what we all buy is really necessary?  And what could we get second hand instead, or just make do with something else?

Totally in sync with that, Tupp, every word.

I think if this view doesn't take a huge bite out of Western consumerism/materialism/statusism and FAST, historians will look back and say, if only they'd accepted what was necessary to save it all. Then they'll put their futuristic gas masks back on and go back to work in their bunkers, pondering our foolishness.

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Hops
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Hopalong

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Re: Coronavirus
« Reply #448 on: December 14, 2020, 09:17:55 AM »
Even though I started that Hax thread, I figure these two belong here. I just love her directness with language, maybe that's why I'm a fan! Hugs--Hops
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Dear Carolyn: I've been sheltering in place for nine months now, venturing out only to the grocery store, pharmacy and a monthly haircut (in masks always). With the spike in infections and deaths, I decided not to join family from four households for Thanksgiving. I got a lot of negative feedback about my decision and feel really bad about it.

I'm scheduled to host Christmas this year — and family members are telling me they won't follow my desires for separation and the like. Am thinking I ought to pull out from hosting.

Your thoughts about all of this?

— Over 65, Overweight, With Underlying Condition

Over 65, Overweight, With Underlying Condition: Yes, cancel Christmas.

I am sorry for that.

I am sorry for your past nine months of restricted living.

I am sorry your people are acting like toads when all they have to do to show their love is assure you they’d rather have you around for a long and fulfilling life than get their way for one stupid day.

I am sorry I called Christmas stupid.

But, wow.

I hope the toadishness is really that they all miss you and are upset they won’t spend time with you and are just saying this badly.

Keep exercising your freedom in service of community health and against recklessness. Heroism wears a mask and follows guidelines and cancels group Christmas and stands up to the misinformed. Thank you for being brave.

Dear Carolyn: What is the appropriate response to guilt-tripping from an elderly mother who frequently says she'll "probably die from something else" before covid is over and it is safe to visit again?

— Anonymous

Anonymous: “I’m doing my part to make sure that doesn’t happen, by keeping my distance now. For us and for all the people like us.

“I do hear you, Mom. This is awful.”

Then in lieu of re-litigating this with her, simply commit to, recommit to, double-down on all of the other means you have available to you to remain connected. All of which are clearly poor substitutes for a hug, but they’re something.

Few can be perfect here, but most can improve . . . something. And the more people behave better, the sooner we all see one another. Everyone. It’s on us to remain as compassionate as we are resolute.
"That'll do, pig, that'll do."

Twoapenny

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Re: Coronavirus
« Reply #449 on: December 15, 2020, 05:29:14 AM »
I have to admit, Hopsie, this is the stuff I don't understand - I get someone who is vulnerable to the virus getting annoyed with people who don't take precautions.  I can't get my head around fit and healthy people getting angry with someone who's trying to avoid dying from it?  Particularly as things like Thanksgiving and Christmas are supposed to be about celebrating life and sharing with people.  It kind of boggles my mind that people get angry with folk who are trying to stay alive (and who've made big sacrifices like that lady has - I expect she wants nothing more than to spend a day with the people she cares about but the risk for her would be great).  I just don't understand how that works in someone's mind.  I hope she's able to stand firm and keep herself safe.  It makes me glad I fell out with all of my relatives years ago so there's no expectation to see anyone xx