Author Topic: Coronavirus  (Read 46174 times)

lighter

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Re: Coronavirus
« Reply #705 on: March 10, 2022, 05:05:23 PM »
So the girls and I had the J&J vaccine.

L was miserable and very leaky with Covid. J less so, but likely experienced less exposure and load.

On the whole, it must not be THAT easy to get, bc I didn't get it and my brother's gf didn't get it when she cared for him during his bout withi Covid.  To be fair, he might not have still been contagious when she arrived.

I'd like to say..... I KNOW something more about Covid, for this experiene,  but I'm still very confused in all directions.

Lighter


Twoapenny

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Re: Coronavirus
« Reply #706 on: March 16, 2022, 01:17:47 PM »
I think it's a very confusing virus, Lighter.  Almost everyone I know has had it now.  Most people I know are vaccinated.  I know of a family where the dad and son both had it, mum and daughter didn't get it - all living together at the same time.  One friend of mine works in a care home - almost everyone in there, whether staff or resident, has had it, some have had it twice.  He hasn't caught it.  Someone else I know lives alone, doesn't have visitors, his only social contact is a once weekly trip to the supermarket, he goes early in the morning when it's quiet, was wearing a mask from the outset as he has a medical background and knew it was risky, has followed all the hygiene protocols - and he got it.  It's very random.  I'm glad you've all got through it/over it xx

lighter

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Re: Coronavirus
« Reply #707 on: March 16, 2022, 06:00:31 PM »
Hi, Tupp!  I hear all kinds of stories too.  Lots of different symptoms and puzzling details about how people get and avoid getting it. 

I'm so glad to see you on the board.

Lighter

Hopalong

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Re: Coronavirus
« Reply #708 on: April 05, 2022, 08:00:58 PM »
Got my 4th shot today (Pfizer, 2nd booster). They're authorized for the elderly but advice is still forming, since scientist don't yet have the data to give firm directions about the timing.

Overall, if you're my age, with anything underlying, they say, go get it. BUT...there's also speculation about the right timing. A few say waiting MIGHT be better as the immune response could be stronger if you do. Others mention companies working like mad to develop a new shot (for this fall, hopefully) that will also hit variants -- and that if that's coming, perhaps it's better to not take Booster #2 now, for a stronger response in the fall. You'd take it along with your annual flu shot.

Basically, as the general advice as of now is...if you're old or immuncompromised (or both), go ahead. If you're not or your location is not "hot", you can likely wait.

I read until my eyes hurt and decided to go with the general advice and not try to pretend I have special insight. I firmly believe 90%+ of scientists are genuinely and honorably trying to save the most lives and offer the best advice that's currently possible. If they get some things wrong I won't take offense. Science goes up and down like a pendulum and it can take a while to land on certitude.

Meanwhile, glad I got it because it does lower the tension internally. I still mask with an N95 indoors in public spaces, even a restaurant today where I went for pickup and saw it packed with VERY old people from the ritzy retirement community next door....and hardly any of them were sporting a mask. Kind of shocked me, for that demographic. I lurked in a drafty foyer until my order was ready and beat it.

Friends are mostly cautious and not shopping, but there's always someone who's desperate to go spend in public and can't get into ordering online. Friends, not many but it's picking up, are watching forecasts and meeting outdoors when it's warm. I have a lunch coming up soon with my pal on the Trees Commission. She loves to talk about it and hooked me up with a grant for free native trees and shrubs for my property!

All in all, sounds like this spring and summer should be a lot less burdensome, covid-wise, than the last. My secret is: develop near-agoraphobia, simplifies a lot of decisions. Turns out I'm not alone in feeling like a cave-creature who keeps stepping out then scooting back in. Good to know it's not uncommon.

hugs
Hops
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Pseudo Mouse

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Re: Coronavirus
« Reply #709 on: June 05, 2022, 11:00:03 PM »
I'm so burnt out on Covid.

Since I have asthma, well I went to get the first shot which consisted of two doses. But now again I'm out of date I guess no longer covered.

I don't want to read the science and opinions. The thing is there is ENOUGH DOUBT sowed that it makes me feel uneasy.

The reports of people supposedly now having heart issues.

On one hand part of me wants to nihilistically just die of a heart attack in my sleep soon but I wouldn't be so lucky would I.

There is one guy who has been following it closely, him and his wife were both science teachers but that doesn't make them virologists. Bret Weinstein and Heather Heying is their names.

The covid camps left and right have turned into full-on cults in their own way. Bret Weinstien seems to think it's a point of pride and specialness for not getting the shot, he talks about it as though not getting the shots is sorting out the smart people from the dumb people. Bleh. That's why I'm so tired of it, it's become too much of an identity in itself.

Covid is kind of a quietly looming thing that sits in the back of my mind, in lots of people's minds and adds another layer of stress. People mentioning shots on Twitter and whatnot almost makes me wanna scream no matter what their opinion is.

All I can say is I think the CDC was once respected and now the reputation has gone to mud.

Then there was the Mary Poppins singing Nina Jankowicz. I said I was going to ignore and avoid politics. I'm really truly feeling it's a waste of my personal time.

But fk now I am wondering if I should go get another stupid shot.

There is some Disney documentary about Fauci.
There are movies against Fauci.

It's all sort of TOO much.

Hopalong

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Re: Coronavirus
« Reply #710 on: June 06, 2022, 12:57:57 AM »
I found out a third friend has covid yesterday.
My city has gone from "yellow" up to "orange."
It's a slow surge here.

I don't fear a week's misery, I fear long covid.
So my decision's clear -- I'll take very shot they'll
give me.

I avoid the individuals who preach one political side
or another, and stick with scientists in major reputable
media. All put together, I feel I have a reasonable view,
and all the decent scientists always spell out that this
whole thing is EVOLVING. And people who can't bear
that uncertainty make it a belief system.

I guess in ways it is. I worked in medical center long
enough that I developed major respect for their minds,
their work, their intense concentration on finding facts
and developing answers. I can't fathom people dismissing
it.

Whatever's on social or other political media for attention
and argument's sake makes little sense to me.

Be well, Mouse. I have asthma too and old age and had a
stroke. I also couldn't be an anti-vaxxer if I tried. So glad
I never got polio or smallpox....

hugs
Hops
"That'll do, pig, that'll do."

sKePTiKal

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Re: Coronavirus
« Reply #711 on: June 06, 2022, 10:43:30 AM »
Because Hol works on set with producers & "name" cast, she MUST be vaccinated and she MUST be tested every day before she's cleared to work. Same with everyone else, everywhere on the crew. Everyone is masked, even on 12 hr days.

This current production has already been down 2 weeks, due to people falling out with covid. She came home early last week, as well, because the producer is still out. So, I'm still glad I'm a hermit. Even though I can't base any avoidance of the crap on just that reason. She is terrified she'll get it and give it to me... and her anxiety manifests in - shall we call it, VIGOROUS? - ways. She gets yell-y about all the bad things going on that none of us are responsible for or able to control.

No doubt, the virus is mutating faster than vaccines can be adapted to prevent infection. So while I'm sure it HELPS, it's not a "Get Out of Covid for Free" card. The idea that pro and against the vaxx has gotten cultish, I totally agree with. I get that everyone has to make the best choice for themselves. And it's a waste of time/energy trying to convince people to change their personal decisions. Not to mention, really frustrating.
Success is never final, failure is never fatal.

Pseudo Mouse

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Re: Coronavirus
« Reply #712 on: June 06, 2022, 03:44:21 PM »
Yep the politics of Covid has gotten out of control.

Wow Skep that's pretty intense. I do understand people being careful. The behavior of being careful though in a group that constant testing and everything contributes to the anxiety though. Not saying they shouldn't do it just that it sounds like an anxious group.

I've got so many things on my mind that everyday I totally forget to worry about Covid.  :( 

Sounds super stressful though and it's interesting that you are having a convo about it here because elsewhere I don't hear people talking too much about personal accounts of it anymore.
« Last Edit: June 06, 2022, 03:50:39 PM by Pseudo Mouse »

sKePTiKal

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Re: Coronavirus
« Reply #713 on: June 06, 2022, 08:06:19 PM »
I just thought I'd pass it on Mouse. This is her real experience. She brings it back to me.

I'm not trying to convince anyone of what they should do. I made my choice. Others need that grace too. I don't think any less of people choosing different from me. It's their lives. Their choices. It's OK with me; truly.

It makes a hard job harder. She sez she probably won't go back to it. (there are other important factors) But she'll still keep trying to work in this industry. Making more money per hour.

I really don't go off the farm much anymore. So I don't know what it's like "out there".
Success is never final, failure is never fatal.

Pseudo Mouse

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Re: Coronavirus
« Reply #714 on: June 06, 2022, 08:13:26 PM »
Oh, I believe you Skep.

Corona virus still does worry me and I take it seriously.

sKePTiKal

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Re: Coronavirus
« Reply #715 on: June 06, 2022, 11:23:50 PM »
It is exhausting Mouse. I'm too old to care that much. I have lived a life. But I'm still not "average". (How is it??!) But here we are. We're dealing with all this crap.

Just another day; more crap to deal with. And yet neither you or I will not go out, without screaming our truth to the world. And today is NOT that day. We still don't do that. I really don't know why it's not now. Maybe it should be. Maybe it would save someone. Who is supposed to decide? Is it US in the end? I don't know.

I really wish I had answers that were satisfactory. I don't.
Success is never final, failure is never fatal.

Hopalong

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Re: Coronavirus
« Reply #716 on: June 07, 2022, 08:57:31 AM »
Good 4/25 (Post) discussion about long covid with a senator. Pretty much explains my reasons to N95, avoid going into stores if curbside's available, skip indoor dining, etc. I'm sad that we don't educate well enough in the US for more people to have been ready to withstand a trial of uncertainty and to accept the realistic pace of science at the pandemic's outset -- it could have saved so much personal and economic misery. Instead, our culture immediately collapsed into blaming, threatening, whining and panicking. We have a starved educational system which created a fault line, and we cracked.

What kinds of symptoms are we talking about when we talk about long COVID? And what are the--what's the range, and how big a health problem is this?

SEN. KAINE: Frances, you started off with two of the tough questions. The range is broad, and the scope of the problem we're still trying to determine. So let me tackle scope and then I'll tackle the range of symptoms. So, the estimates that I'm seeing suggest that anywhere between 5 and 30 percent of people who get COVID could have persistent long COVID symptoms. Now, obviously, that is a very broad range. The numbers I've seen in the United States suggest that about 80 million people had been diagnosed with COVID. But many were never diagnosed. They got COVID before there was testing, for example. So, it's--in all likelihood, the number of Americans who’ve had COVID is in excess of a hundred million. So, it could be 5 million long COVID sufferers. It could be 30 million. And we still have to do more to really figure that out.

And then the second issue that you asked is, well, what are the symptoms, and they come into different buckets. So, there's neurological symptoms. I have a nerve tingling sensation that kicked in right when I got COVID in March of 2020, and it's never gone away. Others have a loss of taste or smell, or a light sensitivity. So, it's a vision issue, or tinnitus ringing in their ear. These all seem kind of related. There's probably nothing wrong with my skin or somebody else's taste buds, but the way the brain interprets sense data kind of gets scrambled a little bit.

There's respiratory conditions that some people have. These are very serious. People who have had no past history of heart issues find that their heart rates race up and down in random and troubling ways. Pulmonary and respiratory problems are pretty common, people who got the respiratory form of COVID and they don't ever feel like they've really been able to come back to a place where they're not short of breath.

And then intense fatigue. People who were, you know, 10k or marathon runners who now have a hard time walking around the block without getting too tired. I visited with some long COVID patients in Appalachian Virginia last week and heard stories about this intense fatigue. There are other symptoms as well. But what they tell us is that just as COVID is kind of a multi-system attacker, long COVID also can just manifest itself in very, very different ways among different people.

MS. STEAD SELLERS: So, you've pinpointed a huge problem here, that we have a vast range of symptoms that affects people differently. Some estimates I've seen from the GAO, the Government Accountability Office, match with yours--I think they're saying between 7.7 million and 23 million people could already have been diagnosed. Do you expect those numbers to go up?

SEN. KAINE: I do, because I think we're--I mean, first, there are still people getting COVID. Even after vaccination, people are getting new variants of COVID. Now, we don't know yet--if you've been vaccinated, we sort of know that if you get COVID, your symptoms are likely to be milder. That's great. But what we don't necessarily know is the correlation between mild COVID symptoms and whether you get long COVID or not.

I had a very mild case of COVID in late March of 2020, into the early part of April, and I--and then I gave COVID to my wife, and she had a very mild case, too. Her symptoms had been gone within 10 days. A particular symptom that I have, this nerve tingling thing, has stayed. So, you have people with mild cases who have long COVID. And then you have people who've had very serious COVID cases, been on ventilator for months, and they have no long COVID symptoms. I think as a general rule, what we're finding is, the more serious your case of COVID, the more likely you are to have long COVID symptoms. There does seem to be a little bit of a gender bias in long COVID where about 60 percent of people who are reporting long COVID are women rather than men.

But again, Frances, I'll just say I think we're really at the front end of this, even though we've been in the research mode about long COVID for about a year now. We know the questions to ask. We're getting some data back, but there's a lot more to do to really understand this and then provide relief to people.
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lighter

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Re: Coronavirus
« Reply #717 on: June 08, 2022, 11:40:39 AM »
Long Covid.

Some people have a hard time.... some don't.  I feel like my symtoms improved in 2 weeks, then I got another virus and it moved into my lungs..... so..... it's difficult to say what's creating all the fatigue for me now.

 I know my tendency is to get up and DO something when i feel better, but this time I keep getting knocked back down, hard, in a weak, passy outy sort of weakness....way..... buzzy headed...... not surprised I feel it, but surprised it's so extreme.  Still coughing up chunks that surprise me every time.... it's this second virus, not the Covid, I'm sure. 

Feeling better....youngest dd feeling better, but still weak with throat still sore. 

Lighter






Pseudo Mouse

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Re: Coronavirus
« Reply #718 on: June 08, 2022, 03:15:47 PM »
an acquaintance of mine said he had the symptoms of long covid even though he never tested positive for covid

he is also one of those people inclined to think whatever he has is just a cold

it lasted for a good part of a year though according to him

he is also one of those long distance cyclists so his baseline stamina is probably higher than the average

I've not read about long covid too much but here and there I see people mentioning it

hopefully whatever it is goes away